Justin Royer

Where Do Good Ideas Come From?

March 26, 2016

I’ve come to realize that as modern professionals, we’ve largely inherited a view of leadership built on an era long gone – the industrial age.  That age taught us to value incremental improvements (make the car a color other than black!) as well as efficiency (how can we crank out 10 more axles per hour?). Our “strategic planning” efforts involving giant 50-page Word documents filled with untested assumptions are testament to the way things used to work. The problem with all of this is, of course, increasing complexity and rate of change. This increased pace of change and knowledge creation puts us in an era where the old rules don’t cut it. Instead, we need creativity. We need ideas. I’ve found that many modern professionals don’t know how to inspire great ideas. Instead, the knee jerk reaction is to analyze the problem until it relents. But it never does. Richard Buchanan from Carnegie Mellon University does a good job of explaining why: “We […]

Business Strategy before Digital Strategy

March 5, 2016

Do you have a digital strategy? It’s a loaded question that gets asked frequently these days. Before we can jump into this question, we have to ask the question before the question. What does “digital strategy” mean? If you ask 10 professionals this basic and fundamental question you’ll likely get 11 different answers. What do some of those answers sound like? Here are some examples: It’s a way to find more leads using paid search advertising It’s selling products and services online It’s banner ads desperately trying to get people to click on them It’s an digital CRM system that allows my sales team to track prospects and turn them into clients It’s developing a website that naturally draws traffic through organic search and quality content It’s mobile technology that allows users to find restaurants and quickly read reviews and ratings It’s equipping a salesforce with tablets and personalized presentation content so they can better conduct face to face selling […]

Kairos vs. Chronos Planning

Kairos vs. Chronos Planning

December 29, 2015

The Greek had two very different words for our word “time”. The first is the word “chronos” from which we get the English word chronology. It means times, dates, and places – regular time as we experience in western culture. The second word for time from the Greek is “kairos” where we get the phrase “kairotic moments” which means “the fullness of time”, “at the right time”, “at the appropriate time”. There are plenty of cultures around the globe which prefer this type of time. So what? What does this have to do with business? I see at least two important reasons to think about these two types of time as it relates to you and your business. First off, inside our walls, we tend to (over) value chronos time. Everything has to be planned, scheduled, calendarized, reduced to individual tasks, etc. And this isn’t bad, in fact, it’s necessary to a good degree to operate a business. But we […]

Planning in a VUCA World (wait, what?)

Planning in a VUCA World (wait, what?)

December 23, 2015

Planning. To some it’s a four letter word. To others, it’s an activity that never happens in their organization. No matter how you think about planning, you’ve probably noticed that to be effective, it needs to be done in a much different way than it used to. Why is that? Well. In a word. VUCA. Actually, that’s an acronym. And it stands for the Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous environment we find ourselves and our businesses in. In a world changing so fast, we can’t rely on the rigid and financial-only-centric methods of our past. So what does the planning organization of the future (and the present, if they’re good) look like? It looks agile. Here are five key dimensions to an agile planning organization. Begin with purpose. Farmers have a 20 year vision but react to today’s weather. They begin with the purpose of their farm and all decisions are viewed through that lens. It should be no different […]

Six factors toward innovation

Six factors toward innovation

November 20, 2015

Innovation isn’t just a buzzword…it’s an imperative of survival in our rapidly changing world. In fact, our friend Peter Drucker had this to say on the importance of innovation: “Business has only two functions — marketing and innovation.” Because we see the body as the most appropriate metaphor for leadership and management, it’s led us to create a list of six important factors that bring organizations toward (or away) a culture of innovation. Purpose. Organizations that involve change and innovation in their “why” are naturally set up to pursue innovation. Values and cultural norms. If your organization values diversity of opinion as well as taking risk, you’re more likely to innovate. Flow of information. Is your business’s knowledge easily collected and shared to others? To the degree it is, it’ll be easier for you to innovate. Diversity of thought and experience.Tough problems call for unique solutions and unique solutions come from diverse backgrounds. Financial model. This is rarely discussed, but […]

Religious kids don’t share

Religious kids don’t share

November 15, 2015

Dave and I recently did a podcast on sharing where Dave opened the topic with an observation that people outside the church seemed to be sharing more than those inside the church. Recent research seems to point in this direction as well. Here’s an excerpt from a recent study referenced by the LA Times. Children who grow up in nonreligious homes are more generous and altruistic than children from observant families. A series of experiments involving 1,170 kids from a variety of religious backgrounds found that the non-believers were more likely to share stickers with their classmates and less likely to endorse harsh punishments for people who pushed or bumped into others.The results “contradict the common-sense and popular assumption that children from religious households are more altruistic and kind toward others,” according to a study published this week in the journal Current Biology. The study essentially says that children brought up in “religious” households are less likely to share than those […]

Factors that Allow for (Effective) Collective Intelligence

Factors that Allow for (Effective) Collective Intelligence

October 5, 2015

We recently had an opportunity to visit with our friends at The Barnabas Group, who is an organization devoted to helping pair up ministry organizations with the knowledge of local leaders. These organizations come to the organization with a need and local business community members brainstorm solutions and volunteer to help on the spot. We were amazed at how the business community quickly ideated innovative solutions to very difficult problems in this kind of forum. It got us thinking… If creating collective intelligence is so important, what then are the keys to success? What are common barriers? In another post, we wrote about the five core dimensions to collective intelligence. From our POV, these are the fundamentals that allow collective intelligence to emerge. But it’s more nuanced than that and it’s worth discussing additional factors that are critical to success. In our experience (and what we witnessed largely via The Barnabas Group event), here’s a list of factors that lead […]

Five Dimensions to Collective Intelligence

Five Dimensions to Collective Intelligence

October 2, 2015

We talk a lot about the “collective” here. In fact, we named ourselves after it. And it’s because we firmly believe that all of us are better than one of us. That being said, I think many of us have had experiences where we witnessed the opposite happening – more of us was actually worse than one of us. Why does that happen? That question has led me to understand the importance of five primary dimensions that allow collective intelligence to successfully emerge. Technology. These are the tools we use to store and share knowledge. Wikis, social nets, task management systems, are good examples. When people discuss collective intelligence, they are often talking about tools at this level. But tools alone won’t get it done. Rituals. These are the interactions between team members that allow knowledge to flow and transfer. Things like after-action reviews (“post-mortems”) and Knowledge Cafes are examples. Said another way, this is the “people working with people” […]