process

Factors that Allow for (Effective) Collective Intelligence

Factors that Allow for (Effective) Collective Intelligence

October 5, 2015

We recently had an opportunity to visit with our friends at The Barnabas Group, who is an organization devoted to helping pair up ministry organizations with the knowledge of local leaders. These organizations come to the organization with a need and local business community members brainstorm solutions and volunteer to help on the spot. We were amazed at how the business community quickly ideated innovative solutions to very difficult problems in this kind of forum. It got us thinking… If creating collective intelligence is so important, what then are the keys to success? What are common barriers? In another post, we wrote about the five core dimensions to collective intelligence. From our POV, these are the fundamentals that allow collective intelligence to emerge. But it’s more nuanced than that and it’s worth discussing additional factors that are critical to success. In our experience (and what we witnessed largely via The Barnabas Group event), here’s a list of factors that lead […]

Five Dimensions to Collective Intelligence

Five Dimensions to Collective Intelligence

October 2, 2015

We talk a lot about the “collective” here. In fact, we named ourselves after it. And it’s because we firmly believe that all of us are better than one of us. That being said, I think many of us have had experiences where we witnessed the opposite happening – more of us was actually worse than one of us. Why does that happen? That question has led me to understand the importance of five primary dimensions that allow collective intelligence to successfully emerge. Technology. These are the tools we use to store and share knowledge. Wikis, social nets, task management systems, are good examples. When people discuss collective intelligence, they are often talking about tools at this level. But tools alone won’t get it done. Rituals. These are the interactions between team members that allow knowledge to flow and transfer. Things like after-action reviews (“post-mortems”) and Knowledge Cafes are examples. Said another way, this is the “people working with people” […]

What if the problem you face is nobody’s fault?

What if the problem you face is nobody’s fault?

February 5, 2014

The most unlikely consulting contract I have ever embarked on started with nearly a shouting match between me and the Board of Directors. They had asked me to review the situation, and make a proposal to work with them to solve their crises. Essentially, half the Board had decided they had enough grievances against the CEO that they were ready to firm him tomorrow. The other half felt long term loyalty to him because he had built the organization from scratch and almost single handily had made it into the large successful institution it was today. After reviewing many parts of the situation, I suggested to them that the root of the problems they were facing had very little to do with the CEO, and much more to do with the system and processes they created to lead the organization. I pointed to a stage of organizational life where the systems and processes of operating the company must go through […]

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